“A love affair with duct tape” – Carla Myers 

By Aleah Green

 

Grace Myersmith is a 10-year-old girl whose interest in duct tape began with a special on Myth Busters. From there it became a school science project and developed into a month of creating duct tape bags, purse, and bookmarks.

Grace is a first time vendor at the Children and Youth sidewalk sale of Central Pennsylvania’s Arts Fest. Though she is a fairly new creator of duct tape products, Grace says that there is a possibility for her to sell her creations outside of the festival. Grace’s father Bill Smith said, “She committed to doing this and worked really hard.”

“Her creativity is all within her.” says Lori Pacchioli.

It’s all about creativity

By Katrina Wang and Jenny Liu

 

 

It is 13th July, the first day of Penn State Art festival. Julia and Rachel are doing their side walk sale. According to them, this festival is all about creativity. Children also get to practice their management and business skills. “It is really fun and we’re looking forward to do it next year.”

Betsy’s in the stacks

By Victoria Mione and Adriana Frazier

 

Penn State has a reputation for its ghosts. From a mule that haunts the dorms, to a wife watching her husband’s grave, ghost stories are just a part of the university’s history. But of all the legends, one of the most known is Betsy in the stacks.

It is rumored that Betsy haunts the stacks of the Pattee Library, the place where an unknown assailant stabbed and killed her. Many people who have been in the stacks have reported paranormal experiences, such as the feeling of being choked, seeing Betsy herself or hearing the sound of books falling.

The young faces of art

By Rachel Amundson and Jessica Lin 

Every summer, the streets of downtown State College are filled with stands selling colorful paintings, photographs and diligently crafted items made by some of the finest artists in the area. The Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts kicked off with Children an Youth Day Wednesday, gathering young artists to exhibit and sell their arts and crafts.

Arts Fest’s Children and Youth Day features more than 250 young artists. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Arts Fest’s Children and Youth Day features more than 250 young artists. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Elaina Martin and Lauren Brenatt, both 11, were two best friends who love to create. This year they decided to sell their art together at the festival for the first time, with a dashing name “Crafty Queens.”

Martin hand made a variety of clay sculptures, ranging from small animal figurines to jewelry pieces. Her interests in clay making began about a year ago, inspired by crafters on YouTube who made sculptures out of polymer clay. The young artist said she has always been interested in art and enjoyed making it.

Eleven-year old best friends Elaina Martin (left) and Lauren Brenatt pose with their clay and yarn creations, which they hope to sell out of. Together, they are known as the “Crafty Queens.” Arts Fest’s Children and Youth Day features more than 250 young artists. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Eleven-year old best friends Elaina Martin (left) and Lauren Brenatt pose with their clay and yarn creations, which they hope to sell out of. Together, they are known as the “Crafty Queens.” Arts Fest’s Children and Youth Day features more than 250 young artists. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Martin’s partner entrepreneur, Brenatt, created “Yarn Pets” and brought them to life with her own hands. Ever since receiving a pompom maker kit for her birthday, Brenatt has enjoyed being able to express her creative mind through her yarn animals.

Brenatt handmade a unique variety of “Yarn Pets” to sell. They were a popular product among customers. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Brenatt handmade a unique variety of “Yarn Pets” to sell. They were a popular product among customers. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

 

Despite this being their first attempt at selling arts, the “Crafty Queens” were nonetheless ambitious, hoping to sell all of their items and reach a goal of earning $300. They planned on donating $100 of the money made to their local hospital.

Sean McLaughlin, a 15-year-old photographer from Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, sold his art — photography — at Arts Fest, too.

Fifteen-year-old Sean McLaughlin showcases a collection of nature photos he has taken in his neighborhood and on his family trips. McLaughlin is an Arts Fest veteran, this being his fourth year participating. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Fifteen-year-old Sean McLaughlin showcases a collection of nature photos he has taken in his neighborhood and on his family trips. McLaughlin is an Arts Fest veteran, this being his fourth year participating. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

McLaughlin lives in a wooded area, so he enjoys taking pictures of the nature around his house. He also said he likes to snap shots while traveling. His interest was sparked about four years ago when he first began to shoot photos. This year marks McLaughlin’s fourth year selling his photos at Arts Fest.

“I’m just out here to have fun,” he said.

Twelve-year-old Corinne Toto set up shop selling stuffed bunnies made from socks. Each bunny was a different design, and Toto said she tried to match the patterns of the accessories.

Twelve-year-old Corinne Toto put her stuffed sock bunnies on display to sell. Toto carefully accessorized each bunny creatively; going through a meticulous gluing process. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Twelve-year-old Corinne Toto put her stuffed sock bunnies on display to sell. Toto carefully accessorized each bunny creatively; going through a meticulous gluing process. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Toto said she started making the bunnies four months prior to the festival. She said that the hardest part was decorating the faces, as well as staying patient while the they dried.

Toto lays out an assortment of her sock bunnies, all of which were differently designed. They sell for $2 each. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

Toto lays out an assortment of her sock bunnies, all of which were differently designed. They sell for $2 each. (Photo by Jessica Lin)

With their skills and enthusiasm, the young artists brought in a flood of community members and visitors from all over Pennsylvania and beyond to the streets of downtown State College. Arts Fest started Wednesday and runs through Sunday. Celebrating its 50th anniversary, the festival expects the peak number of participants over the weekend.

Sisters excel in doll accessory business

By Andrea Klick 

Sisters Brooke and Kiera Whitman sold doll accessories, painted seashells and flags for the first time this year at the Children and Youth Day Sidewalk Sale.

Over six weeks, the 8- and 10-year-old girls collaborated to create food and picnic blankets for dolls, paint seashells and make flags.

According to Kiera, the stand’s first year has proven successful.

“We’ve sold a lot of things so far, and I think that I’m pretty happy we did it this year,” Kiera said.

The girls hope to continue making and selling crafts for Arts Fest in future years.

“And since we liked it so much, we think that we’re going to do it next year and

after that year we’re going to do it the next year,” Brooke said.

Craftsmanship passed down family tree

By Olivia Lattanzi 

When walking through the streets of the Children and Youth Day at Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts  or Arts Fest  there are many examples of talent and passion among the young vendors. 

It seems hard to believe that all of these vendors have accomplished so much before they turn 19. 

Fred Barefield watches as children attending Arts Fest view his work. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

Fred Barefield watches as children attending Arts Fest view his work. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

Two of these vendors are Fred Barefield and Zachary Raupach-Learn, who both work at crafting different items and furniture out of wood. Fred Barefield, 17, of Brockway, Pennsylvania, started making furniture out of wood in ninth grade. 

“When I was in ninth grade, my grandfather just kind of out of nowhere asked me if I wanted to learn how to make rocking chairs,” Barefield said. “So he showed me and then gave me a little building I could work in, and I had my own shop and I designed all these other things after that.” 

Woodworking talent runs in Barefield’s family, who own a furniture-making business and go to different shows along the East Coast. In fact, his grandfather is a vendor in the main Arts Fest show, which is how Barefield originally heard about the event. It is his third year participating at the Art Fest. 

A few pieces Barefield brought to the Children and Youth Day Sidewalk Sale at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

A few pieces Barefield brought to the Children and Youth Day Sidewalk Sale at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

For Barefield, preparing pieces for a festival is not a quick matter. A rocking chair can take about three days. It requires finding the hickory wood and cutting it down in the winter, cutting lengths, steaming the lengths around molds, assembling the pieces together, sanding the piece and putting several coats on to make it smooth. 

In all, it has taken Barefield three to four weeks to make everything that he brought to the Children and Youth Day Sidewalk Sale. Barefield was not the only woodworker on display.

Further up the street was 18-year-old Zachary Raupach-Learn, of State College, Pennsylvania. Raupach-Learn first started working with wood in the seventh grade.

Zachary Raupach-Learn shows off one of his cutting boards. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

Zachary Raupach-Learn shows off one of his cutting boards. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

“I learned it in woodshop in middle school,” RaupachLearn said. “I just kept on doing it because I enjoy it so much.”

At Arts Fest, he had cutting boards for sale as well as Christmas decorations left over from a previous winter craft show. One of these decorations was an ornament made from a walnut that was sliced with a jigsaw so all of the inner formations were visible. 

On average, crafting a cutting board takes Raupach-Learn anywhere from 45 minutes to two hours depending on the size. Although this is his only art festival of the year, this is his fourth time at Arts Fes.

In that time, Raupach-Learn has seen some repeat customers.

“I still have two of your cutting boards from a long time ago,” says a woman passing by his booth and commenting on the quality of his work. “They last.”

Soon after the woman leaves, a man and his two children approach the stand. He asks Raupach-Learn if he has sold the “really complicated board,” which sold within five minutes of the festival’s opening. “That was awesome, and I wanted to show these guys how awesome it was,” the man said while motioning toward his children. 

Arts Fest continues through July 17.

From Happy Valley to Hockey Valley

By Jenna Minnig and Clare Bowles

Happy Valley is a nickname heard frequently throughout Penn State’s campus. The valley is most famously known for its the show-stopping football team. Recently, the university’s Division I hockey team made its debut.

Drawn to art: State College hosts annual Arts festival

By Chelsea Kun, Adriana Frazier, Victoria Mione and Matthew Hensen

Families all across the country are converging on State College for the annual Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Kicking off with Children and Youth Day, Arts Fest will last from July 13 to July 17, and families will be able to partake in variety of activities as well as purchase trinkets from a multitude of different vendors.

The booths themselves feature anything from crochet objects to elaborate paintings, all of which are created by the people who run the booths. According to StateCollege.com, “Aside from Penn State home football games, no other single event brings as much excitement and energy to the State College area as the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts.”

As it was Children and Youth Day, many of the booths were set up by younger people rather than adults. The booths featured anything from plush dolls to cosmic paintings, soap made from goat’s milk and many other items.

Apart from the booths and vendors, there were many games and activities set up to keep the kids entertained. Kish Bank, located along Allen Street, also got into the fun, allowing kids to draw on the windows of the first floor.

 

Nittany Lion pride

By Linden Markley and Shaina Paris

The Pennsylvania State University is known nationwide for its academics, largely successful sports programs and outgoing student and faculty bodies. The element that ties all of these features together is the university’s mascot, the Nittany Lion.

A former lion suit on display at the Penn State All-Sports Museum. He is wearing gear from some of the events he  attends including track and football. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

A former lion suit on display at the Penn State All-Sports Museum. He is wearing gear from some of the events he attends including track and football. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

According to many students and alumni, this energetic feline is easily one of the most recognizable and iconic faces under the Penn State name. The lion has existed for generations of students and has created his role in the Penn State culture.

Penn State did not have a mascot until 1907, when student Joe Mason attended a baseball game against Princeton University. Mason felt compelled to “top the ferocity” of the Princeton tiger by introducing a mascot to Penn State.

By that time, the Eastern Mountain Lion had already been extinct in Pennsylvania for 100 years but was deemed fit to be the mascot for the university.

The image of the lion has changed significantly throughout its history. When first introduced in 1910, the lion resembled an elongated pig with fangs.

The last Eastern Mountain Lion found in Pennsylvania before the species went extinct in the region is on display at the museum. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

The last Eastern Mountain Lion found in Pennsylvania before the species went extinct in the region is on display at the museum. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

The first public introduction of the Nittany Lion was on Oct. 28, 1922. The lion had a mane and walked on all fours, more like an African Lion. These features eventually formed into the Nittany Lion known by Penn State students and alumni today. He now does not have a mane, and usually sports a blue and white scarf.

Student and visitors can visit a statue of the lion at the Nittany Lion Shrine, a gift from the Penn State Class of 1940.

Heinz Warneke used 13 tons of Indiana limestone to sculpt a shrine of The Nittany Lion in 1942. It took him four months to complete.

As students walk past the statue, they are often encouraged to rub its ears for “good luck,” and it is one of the most popular places for photographs on campus. Smaller versions made from Pennsylvania limestone are located at each of Penn State’s Commonwealth Campuses.

Students and faculty alike continue to feel a connection with the lion in one way or another. Jill Beckman, a rising junior, speak very highly of the lion. She tells of how he “interacts with the crowd” and “makes the whole atmosphere very exciting and fun.”

He can often be seen crowd surfing or celebrating a football touchdown with one-handed push-ups at Penn State Football games.

A statue shows the lion at the Penn State All-Sports Museum performing his signature pose. (Photo by Linden Markley)

A statue shows the lion at the Penn State All-Sports Museum performing his signature pose. (Photo by Linden Markley)

Beckman says that because of the lion, she “feel(s) proud to be a Penn Stater.” At any event, the lion is “so animated and excited,” as well as “going crazy and having fun” with the audience. “You will never see the lion just standing around and doing nothing,” Beckman said.

Having the role of the Nittany Lion is a massive honor for any student, but with that honor there must be talent and responsibility. Ken Hickman, director of the Penn State All-Sports Museum, said the audition process is very intense and complex as the lion is required to preform many different physical tasks during Penn State events, like the push-ups at touchdowns.

There can also only be one lion at a time, so his schedule is always very full.

“Nobody works harder for their scholarship than the lion does,” Hickman said. The lion may have to attend up to or more than five events in a single day at different locations on campus. The student who is chosen must work very hard to be a prominent figure at events and to maintain the honorable position of the Penn State Nittany Lion.

Throughout the Penn State community, the Nittany Lion can be seen as an emblem of connection and family. The lion is much more than just a sports team’s mascot. Generations of alumni, current students and fans are able to feel a connection to the lion as a symbol of the university.

The Nittany Lion Shrine is located in a wooded grove and is the most photographed location on the Penn State campus. It was carved out of 13 tons of limestone. (Photo by Linden Markley)

The Nittany Lion Shrine is located in a wooded grove and is the most photographed location on the Penn State campus. It was carved out of 13 tons of limestone. (Photo by Linden Markley)

 

Molly’s Debut

By Jenna Minnig and Clare Bowles

The Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts is an annual attraction to locals of State College. The festivities kicked off on Wednesday as children presented their hard work through drawings, pictures and even jewelry.

One ambitious girl set out on a mission to help dog owners.

Molly Schreiner is from State College. At only 11 years old, she created a small home-based business with her father, Rusty. Molly found herself constantly cleaning up after her dog as the golden retriever would rip apart toy after toy.

“My dog Bailey chews through every single thing in sight,” she said. “And we were sick of buying chew toy after chew toy.” Molly decided enough was enough and created an indestructible dog toy.

Rusty was an asset to the business as he provided Molly with the most essential material of the toy. A local firefighter, Rusty brought home broken fire hoses in which the station had no use for.

The process is quite simple: Molly’s father begins by cutting the hose. The next step is to insert stuffing in the hose with a water knot inside “so it will never come apart.” The duo completes the creation by sewing it four times to be certain that nothing will become loose.

Arts Fest was Molly’s debut. Previously she had only given friends and family the toys to test them out.

“Every single one of them is still in service with the exception of one,” Rusty said. With prices ranging from $10 to $12, Molly’s dog toys were a hit among festivalgoers.

 

Geiger family values

By Saige Petski and Sanjna Pandey

The Geiger family sits perfectly at ease in the chaos of the first day of the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts.

This is a family affair for them as Tate, Lydia and Gabriel interact at their individual booths with potential customers. Their mom, Karlyn Geiger, is the moral support standing behind her three children. She buys materials, acts as their homeschool teacher and encourages them to pursue anything they wish. With their natural charisma, creative spirits and entrepreneurial minds, it’s no wonder the family is able to win over the crowd.

Tate Geiger, 12, has been selling his products for the past few years. Each year he has brought homemade Lego bracelets, and they have been a huge success.

Tate Geiger, 12, has been selling his products for the past few years. Each year he has brought homemade Lego bracelets, and they have been a huge success.

Tate is the eldest of the three Geiger children. As such, he has led the way for his  younger siblings to set up booths alongside him at the Arts Festival. He was initially inspired to make his product when he saw a Lego bracelet in a store. The steep price of the bracelet prompted his mom to encourage him to try to make his own.

Karlyn said that Tate has always been interested in possibly having his own business someday, and this venture made for good practice. Tate marketed his bracelets to local stores, when eventually one agreed to sell his creations.

With the store’s change in ownership, Tate’s product was no longer sold, and he turned to the Arts Festival as a new venue. In his first year at the festival, he made enough of a profit to come back the next year. He said he made more than $200 this past year and bought himself a 3D printer. He looks forward to experimenting with his printer and possibly bringing new products to the Arts Festival in upcoming years. At the moment he’s interested in business and marketing and thinks the festival will give him valuable experience for the future.

Tate’s younger sister, Lydia Geiger, is the middle child in her family and has followed in her older brother’s footsteps as a vendor at the Arts Festival. This was her third year at the festival, and she has sold various products each year.

Lydia Geiger, 11, brought homemade pillows to the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts on Wednesday, July 13, 2016. She made the pillows with the idea that it could comfort patients, and wants to be a nurse when she is older.

Lydia Geiger, 11, brought homemade pillows to the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts on Wednesday, July 13, 2016. She made the pillows with the idea that it could comfort patients, and wants to be a nurse when she is older.

Her first year, she exclusively sold handmade pillows and the second year she sold handmade doll skirts as well. She said they weren’t extremely successful and recognized that she had to look at the market she was in. She concluded that doll skirts would only be bought by girls who had dolls, which narrowed down the number of visitors her product could attract.

This year, she sold handmade pillows, as well as “Penny Pendants,” which she created with friend Ema Scott. Lydia said the “Penny Pendants” would draw in a wider audience, as they could be worn by anyone.

When she grows up, Lydia hopes to be a nurse because she wants to help people, just like her handmade pillows are meant to comfort her customers.

Gabriel Geiger, who is 8 years old, is the youngest in the family. This was his first year participating as a vendor with his older siblings. He was thrilled to be there and to put his Lego- and Minion-themed pencil holders on display.

Gabriel Geiger, 8, is the youngest of the Geiger family. At the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts he sold his homemade pencil holders.

Gabriel Geiger, 8, is the youngest of the Geiger family. At the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts he sold his homemade pencil holders.

He said he marketed them toward a younger crowd and after being open for only half an hour, he already sold four. Gabriel also said that his return to the festival next year is dependent on how popular his products are this year. Even if his booth doesn’t do well, he said he was open to other ideas for next year. He’s inspired by his dad’s work in the college ministry and hopes to grow up to become a missionary.

A family full of creativity and compassion, the Geigers have a special place in their hearts for the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Their natural business sense and understanding of a consumer market help them to draw people in. The kids are driven and open to developing new ideas for the future that could help propel them into even more success — at the festival and beyond.

 

 

Everyone starts somewhere

By Faith Johns and Morgan Bergman

Between booths of tissue paper flowers for $1 and homemade bracelets for $2,  a young boy displays charcoal pictures with price tags upwards $250. A variety of booths peddling photos, paintings, doll clothes, jewelry, soaps and food extended down three blocks of Allen Street on Wednesday.

Everyone has his or her own niche and story at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts at the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale.

Riley Blake and her father sell a necklace to a customer. Blake hands the customer her necklace hoping she enjoys it.

Riley Blake and her father sell a necklace to a customer. Blake hands the customer her necklace hoping she enjoys it.

Riley Blake, 10, from State College, Pennsylvania, is a young artist who enjoys creating jewelry and other crafts. Her main inspiration is her mom’s jewelry company, which inspired her range of jewelry offerings.

“I’m an only child so I get bored sometimes,” Blake said when describing more of her inspirations. Blake makes more than jewelry; she also paints and makes figurines. Her favorite things to make are bracelets because she says it is very calming.

As you walk further into the crowds and clusters of tents, Shirley Zhang’s paintings stand out. She created a lifelike, outdoorsy painting and floral cards that she sold at her table.

Zhang, 15, began painting at very young age and was inspired by her grandfather because he was an artist and his paintings told stories. She looks at several photos of random places for inspiration. For college, she is planning on majoring in art.

Shirley Zhang waits for customers in front of her artwork.

Shirley Zhang waits for customers in front of her artwork.

Self-taught artist Drew Spielvogel, 15, said that after his grandfather’s death he started doing his artwork.

“He was a big art collector of like photorealistic art which is what I do,” Spielvogel said.

He creates his artwork by taking a photo of something and then later draws the picture with either charcoal or pastels. He has been doing this for about three years.

He prefers black-and-white to color so he enjoys using charcoal the most, but he wants to add more pastel work to his portfolio. He said he would like to attend Rhode Island School of Design.

People like Lara Kingshipp stop at his booth to purchase his artwork. Kingshipp said that she would come back and would also like to hire him to do some personal artwork.

Luke Adams sits at his booth, joking while being interviewed.

Luke Adams sits at his booth, joking while being interviewed.

Luke Adams, 17, of State College, Pennsylvania, sells his photographs of nature. His inspiration was his liking of photography, which inspired him to carry his camera around with him wherever he goes. Most of his pictures are taken in Central Pennsylvania.

“I want to be freelance (photographer), but I would like to be a portrait photographer,” said Adams when asked about what he wanted to do career wise with his photography, but for now he just sells his photos.

These four artists showcased and sold their artwork among other artists in between model clay figurines and paper flowers. Everyone has to start somewhere at sometime whether they start at a young age or they start now.

The art is in the detail

A group of multimedia campers took a closer look at some of the work created for the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Check out their gallery! 

Siblings take over Arts Fest

By Shaina Paris

Double trouble isn’t always a bad thing, especially with brothers David and Conner Young, who make rocks with prizes inside at their home. Or with sisters Sally and Ada, who sell homemade tutus with some proceeds going to the Four Diamonds Fund, an organization that helps families whose children are fighting childhood cancer.

Children of all ages brought their creations Wednesday to the Central Pennsylvania Festival of Arts, also known as “Arts Fest.”

David, left, makes a sale. David and Conner are two of many young artists at Arts Fest this year. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

David, left, makes a sale. David and Conner are two of many young artists at Arts Fest this year. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

The Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale is held every year a day before the official start of Arts Fest, which runs July 14 to 17 this year.

David, 11, and Conner, 8, have created “Treasure Stones,” which are homemade dough-like “rocks” that have small toys inside like bouncy balls and nail polish. Two special rocks had $5 inside of them.

Brothers David, 11, and Conner, 8, at their Treasure Stones booth. These are the homemade rocks they are selling at Arts Fest.   (Photo by Shaina Paris)

Brothers David, 11, and Conner, 8, at their Treasure Stones booth. These are the homemade rocks they are selling at Arts Fest.
(Photo by Shaina Paris)

Opening these stones are fairly easy; “you can just crack them open,” David said. Conner added that “you just have to wiggle the stone and it will open and they aren’t hard at all.”

These are all-natural and made with coffee, flour, water, salt and corn meal. The stones are made out of their kitchen.

“A few times a week, like whenever we don’t have anything do to, we say ‘hey everyone so this afternoon we are going to work on stuff,’ and we maybe spend 10 minutes rolling out the dough,” David said. “But my mom had to take them out of the oven since they are going to be hot.”

Each individual rock cost $1 and three rocks only cost $2. These brothers surely love this company and work hard on it.

Sisters Sally, 11, and Ada, 13, are another pair of siblings who stated a company together. They started their tutu business when Ada was beginning middle school and participated in her schools Mini-THON.

Sisters Sally, left, and Ada are sporting off some of their tutus they made.  Some of the profits will be donated to the Four Diamond Fund. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

Sisters Sally, left, and Ada are sporting off some of their tutus they made. Some of the profits will be donated to the Four Diamond Fund. (Photo by Shaina Paris)

Sally explained “Ada wanted to help raise money and also wanted a tutu so she told her friends all about it and then they wanted some so Ada started to sell tutus.” As this is their first year selling tutus Ada says that she “hopes that people will buy one to raise money for the kids and for the ones that buy one feel good about what they bought” Each tutu for those seven and older cost $20 and those who are six and under cost $15. For each tutu that is purchased $2 from each will go to the Four Diamonds Fund.

Interact with athletic equipment in the All-Sports Museum

By Dassie Jin and Celia Zhu

Big sports fans should visit the Penn State All-Sports Museum. There are around 31 different teams that are shown in this museum. Even for people who are not interested in sports, this is still a good place to take the time to see and play around with different equipment that you may have not encountered in your entire life.

The All-Sports Museum is located in Beaver Stadium and is a museum full of sports history. For example, there are exhibits for track and field, baseball, tennis, softball, basketball, football and more. The mission of the museum is to allow later generations to view their achievements in sports and also protect and promote them. This mission can not only encourage athletes but also encourage people with athletes’ spirits.

Museums are not always as boring as some people think. The All-Sports Museum is not like other museums that only include words and pictures, but it also has real athletic equipment that was used in the matches. Though people can’t physically touch all of them, the All-Sports Museum gives them a chance to try some of them.

People can touch and feel the equipment that they can’t normally see in daily life unless they are athletes. For example, on the first floor, the flooring in each exhibit is different, showcasing the field for that team so people can experience the feeling of that sport.

On the second floor, in the gymnastics exhibit, there are walls that people can flip. They show some normal gymnastics movement, which is difficult to the average person, and it asks people if they can do them or not. There is also more athletic equipment that waits for people to discover and try.

All this athletic equipment helps people learn more about sports through an attractive, lively and interactive way.

Sharing the knowledge

By Emily DiPasquale and Natalie Schield

The Penn State Communications Camps provides a way for high school students to shadow their future college professors and students, and receive wisdom.

During the program, camp members of both the Multimedia Journalism and Broadcast track had the chance to participate in a mock press conference at the Penn State All-Sports Museum. This opportunity allowed the young students to know what is expected from them as journalists.

The Multimedia Journalism and Broadcast Communications Camps took a trip to the Penn State All-Sports Museum for an educational journalistic reporting experience. (Photo by Natalie Schield)

The Multimedia Journalism and Broadcast Communications Camps took a trip to the Penn State All-Sports Museum for an educational journalistic reporting experience. (Photo by Natalie Schield)

Multimedia Camp Director Heather Robbins wanted to offer opportunities to aspiring journalists. As an alumnus and journalist teaching in the College of Communications, Robbins was looking for ways to become more involved in the college. When she came across the high school Communications Camps, she decided to take the program over and expose her knowledge of journalism. Now having been the camp director for four years, she has learned to love sharing her knowledge.

After working at Penn State for a year, Professor Curt Chandler was sucked into the camp because of his ability to work with all types of media. Being able to work with teenagers, Chandler tries to find an interesting and easy way for them to produce stories. He tries to compress all information from a 16-week lecture class into just one week to give teens an idea of what goes on in a college level class.

Jim Voigt has been an All-Sports Museum tour guide for nine years. After teaching and then retiring, Voigt then channeled his love of spreading knowledge into being a museum tour guide.

“I want to share something near and dear to my heart, like Penn State sports,” Voigt said. He is committed to using his time to pass on his wisdom to others.

Overall, there are many opportunities like this camp that can give you an advantage to increase your knowledge that not everyone has access to.

 

 

Sibling sales at Arts Fest

By Linden Markley

On a street in downtown State College, Pa, children sell their colorful ping-pong ball animals for $1. On the other side of the street, a photo-realistic charcoal drawing of Joe Paterno is sold for $250.

This diversity in price and caliber is what makes Children and Youth Day the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts an encouragement to young, local artists to share and sell their artwork, no matter their age or ability.

The day kickstarts the entire Arts Fest, which brings in professional artists from around the country.

Before the day arrives, children ages 8 to 18 from the surrounding area create various forms of art. They then take their work to Allen Street in downtown State College, Pennsylvania, to sell to festivalgoers. Some of the children plan to spend the money they earn, while others plan to buy supplies for the next year’s Children and Youth Day Sidewalk Sale.

As kids gather to show off their artwork, many siblings or family members are often seen manning many of the booths.

Siblings Brandon, 11, and Ashley, 12, sell their artwork at at Children and Youth Day. Ashley’s mermaid necklaces are made out of seashells and beads. (Photo by Linden Markley)

Siblings Brandon, 11, and Ashley, 12, sell their artwork at at Children and Youth Day. Ashley’s mermaid necklaces are made out of seashells and beads. (Photo by Linden Markley)

Siblings Brandon, 11, and Ashley Stuber, 12, share a booth beside their older sister Rachel.

Each of them has their own crafts to sell. Brandon sells finger puppets and clothespin airplanes for $2 each. Ashley sells string art and mermaid necklaces. Rachel sells her paintings and drawings.

The siblings all work together with their mother, Tammy, to run the booths. Brandon said that he and Ashley learned of their crafts on Pinterest and have spent a few weeks making and preparing their artwork for sale.

Their booth is different from other booths at the festival because the people can “touch them, look at them, see what they are,” Brandon said. He uses a finger puppet to tell jokes to the small children who stop by his booth.

Brandon Stuber, 11, greets customers with a handmade finger puppet. He sells them annually at Children and Youth Day at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. (Photo by Linden Markley)

Brandon Stuber, 11, greets customers with a handmade finger puppet. He sells them annually at Children and Youth Day at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. (Photo by Linden Markley)

Ashley began making the mermaid necklaces after her string art success in her previous year participating in Arts Fest. The siblings want to continue to sell at Children and Youth Day in the future.

Down the street, siblings Kyle, 11, and Kaylyn Cunningham, 14, run a particularly pungent booth. They sell handmade soaps and bath bombs made with goat milk.

The cost of a bar of goat milk soap ranges from $1 to $7. Other products include lip balms, sugar scrubs and soap cupcakes.

In a short amount of time, many different people stopped by to look or buy the soaps. Kyle’s mother, Jamie, helps the children run the booth and exchange product with buyers.

Their business is called “Whitetail Lane Farm Goat Milk Soap,” naming the family-owned farm where the goat milk comes from.

Kyle knows all of the goats and says they are named things like Chili Pepper or Annabelle. He and Kaylyn help make the soap by gathering ingredients like the goat milk. This comes from the help of their cousins, Brayden and Logan, as listed on the booth’s sign.

Kyle says that his booth is different because “there aren’t any other cupcake bath bombs here” and notes the many different colors of the products. He said he wants to make enough money to return next year and sell more goat milk soaps.

These and many other booths are run by siblings who work together to make the crafts and peddle their wares as part of the start of Arts Fest.

 

Triplett, Penn State football changed the game

 

By Christian Milcos and Tom He

            Wally Triplett and the 1948 Penn State football team made sports history when the squad rallied around Triplett to ensure that he would be able to play in the Cotton Bowl against Southern Methodist University.

Triplett became the first African-American to play in the Cotton Bowl, which was hosted in Texas. He went on to score the game-winning touchdown to break a 13-13 tie in the fourth quarter.

Penn State: Wally Triplett and “We Are” documentary Director Joshua Shelov pose for picture by Beaver Stadium. (Photo by Laura Waldier)

Jim Voigt, longtime Beaver Stadium employee, said the Cotton Bowl and the NCAA frowned upon allowing African-Americans to play in the Cotton Bowl, as Texas was still segregated at the time. However, Penn State banded together to make sure that the whole squad would make the trip to Dallas. In addition, Voigt said the team threatened to not participate in the game if all their healthy players were not allowed to take the field.

It is rumored that during a meeting debating whether or not the Nittany Lions should participate in the contest, team captain Steve Suhy was the first to utter the words, “We are Penn State.” He then went on to say there would be no more meetings on the eligibility of Triplett.

The legitimacy of this folklore is discussed to this day. Museum director Ken Hickman said the story of Triplett has “utterly no connection whatsoever” to the “we are Penn State” chant.

“The research has been done,” Hickman said. “The chant’s history goes back to the school’s cheerleading squad in the 1970s.”

He said even though a similar phrase may have uttered by someone at the meeting, the chant was ultimately popularized in the ’70s.

“It would be great if there was that established connection, but its really a matter of coincidence more than anything,” Hickman said.

However, with no cameras being readily available to capture the events that transpired at that famous 1948 meeting, others prefer to leave it as an unsolved mystery.

“It (Triplett’s story) is a huge part of the rumor of the origin of the chant part,” Hickman said. “It is certainly an important part of Penn State sports with all the players on that team standing up as one in the action that they took.

The mystery of the “We are Penn State” chant may go forever unsolved, but the stance Penn State took in the late ’40s was a stepping stone in fully integrating college sports.

Penn State football had become notorious for breaking racial barriers during the formative years of college football. The team voted to cancel their trip to Miami to face the Hurricanes the season prior to the controversial Cotton Bowl appearance. In addition, the town and university were able to influence the NCAA to allow blacks and whites to play as one team in the first ever integrated Cotton Bowl.

The “We Are” statue sits in the shadows of Beaver Stadium. Wally Triplett attended the unveiling of this statue earlier this year.(Photo by Tom He)

Triplett then went on to become the third African-American player drafted and the first to take the field during an NFL game, representing Penn State to the fullest during both milestones. Triplett’s story is still told to this day as ESPN recently featured him in a documentary simply titled “We Are.” He continuously gives back to the school that allowed him to live out his dream, by attending football practices and games every fall at 90-years-old.

Triplett and the 1948 Penn State football team may not be as well-known as teams such as the undefeated 1969 and 1994 squads. Despite this, the Bob Higgins-coached 1948 team broke barriers and changed the college football status quo in the South. They truly embodied the phrase, “We are Penn State.”

 

 

 

In Your Dreams

By Natalie Schield and Jharia Morris

Twelve-year-old Lucia Notartomaso caught people’s attention with her bright and unique dreamcatchers. Notartomaso started her own business, “In Your Dreams,” last year at the age of 11. She was inspired by her older sister to create these vibrant dreamcatchers, along with bug jars and lanterns.

With the help of family, Notartomaso is able to create each dreamcatcher different from one another. She brought her creations to the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts to share with the community the past two years. Her favorite part of the festival is being able to witness others work and being able to make her own money.

Notartomaso creates her dreamcatchers by purchasing a loop at her local craft store and using a wide range of colorful ribbon to tie at the bottom. Before selling the final product, she makes sure that the ribbon blends well together and appears interesting.

To make her bug jars, she uses a plain jar and leaves holes at the top so that the jars are habitable for insects. Her lanterns are made from paper mache molded from balloons.

Rocking out at the arts festival

By Christian Milcos, Emily DiPasquale and Tom He

Have you ever picked up a rock and expected to find a toy inside? David, 11, Connor, 8, and Mason Young, 5, have figured out a way to accomplish this.

The Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale of the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts allows kids from around Pennsylvania to showcase their artwork to a broad audience. The Youngs’ participated in this festival by creating “Treasure Stones,” which is their form of a geode. This was their fourth consecutive year participating in the festival.

A sample of the Young family’s “Treasure Stones” at the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale. (Photo by Emily DiPasquale)

A sample of the Young family’s “Treasure Stones”
at the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale. (Photo by Emily DiPasquale)

So, how do they produce such rocks? The Young family used a mixture of cornmeal, flour, coffee grounds, salt and water. They spent a couple of hours producing these rocks for the festival.

“We found the recipe on Pinterest and decided to make a lot for the arts festival,” said David when explaining the background of his family’s booth.

They sold two different kinds of rocks: ones that appeal to girls and ones that appeal to boys. The ones meant for girls had nail polishes and rings inside the rocks while the ones meant for boys had toys like bouncy balls and toy cars.

No matter what stone you got, you had a chance to get one with $5, as two stones contained cash. They were selling these “geodes” for $1 or three geodes for $2.

State College residents David Young, 11, and Connor Young, 8, interact with their customers at the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale. (Photo by Tom He)

State College residents David Young, 11, and Connor Young, 8, interact with their customers at the Children and Youth Sidewalk Sale. (Photo by Tom He)

There were many other crafts sold at the Children and Youth Sidewalk sale like woodworking, dog clothes and a slime booth. However, many customers decided to test their luck and see if they could get the coveted $5.

 

We are … a community

By Rachel Amundson, Jessica Lin, Sanjna Pandey and Saige Peski

For many years, students, alumni and fans have gathered — rain or shine — to support any of the 31 varsity sports teams at Penn State. Regardless of the wins and losses, a community has come together from all over campus to cheer on their favorite teams.

A 1998 Penn State graduate, Ken Hickman now serves as the director of operations at the All-Sports Museum of his alma mater. He said Penn State prides itself in fostering a tight-knit student body with its athletic programs as a large and prominent sports school.

Director Ken Hickman speaks about the athletic programs featured in the Penn State All-Sports Museum.

Director Ken Hickman speaks about the athletic programs featured in the Penn State All-Sports Museum.

According to Hickman, the university’s sports atmosphere is both inclusive and pronounced, distinguishing itself with large student turnouts at athletic events. Furthermore, he said, Penn State has been at the forefront of promoting inclusiveness among all races, sexes and minorities throughout its athletic history.

In fact, it is rumored that the chant “WE ARE Penn State” originates from the words of a former Penn State football coach who was defending two of his African-American players after another team barred them from playing.

While Hickman acknowledges that Penn State is better recognized for some sports, such as football and hockey, he pointedly notes that all programs receive the same attention.

To achieve such equality, Penn State’s campus houses state-of-the-art sports facilities, technology and equipment for each of its teams. For the future, Hickman foresees continual growth of the university’s sports culture and its positive influence on Penn State’s sense of community.

Every day, the museum is filled with people, including employees, who have Penn State pride.

Lori Brown, an employee at the museum, has been working at the All-Sports Museum gift shop for 10 years. The museum is a popular site for visitors who are interested in the history of Penn State sports. She enjoys meeting people from all over the world.

In the past, Brown has met well known and successful alumni, as well as coaches. Brown said that one of her favorite aspects of the job is the fact that everyone who comes in is happy to be where they are.

Sometimes she encounters customers who aren’t in the best of moods, so her goal is to change that.

Lori Brown talks about her 10 years of experience working in the Penn State All-Sports Museum store.

“My mission of the day is to make their day,” Brown said. “If they come in here in a bad mood, I try to get them to leave with a smile.”

Another spirited Penn State fan and employee of the museum is Jim Voigt. Voigt has been working as the operational supervisor at the museum for nine years. He has many positive memories of Penn State football games. Specifically, he remembers the Nittany Lions defeating North Carolina State, 35-27, in an intense game.

One of his fondest memories as a football spectator is watching the game in which John Cappelletti scored four touchdowns that he promised to make for his younger brother who had leukemia. The Penn State fans were unaware of the source of Cappelletti’s motivation until this story was released to the public years later.

Voigt is a proud graduate of Penn State and has continued to spread his pride with others by sharing his memories and knowledge on a topic he is very passionate about.

Jim Voigt reminisces about his experiences at Beaver Stadium as a Penn State student and employee.

Along with museum employees, members of the community as well as fans from all over the country come to the museum to appreciate the history of Penn State sports.

Mike Husband, a resident of Huntington County, Pennsylvania, enjoys visiting the museum. He and his wife are season ticket holders for women’s basketball team.

“It’s nice to have a getaway with sports and a big university and culture and good food,” Husband said.

While the Lady Lions do not receive the same attention as Penn State football, Husband believes the fans that do attend the games are just as dedicated.

According to the fans, Penn State derives much of its identity as a renowned public university from its outstanding sports culture.

Whether contributing to the university’s athletic atmosphere as a student spectator, staff member or athlete, much of the community is involved in athletics in one way or another. Such collective interest has cultivated a very special presence of schoolwide spirit and unity that manifests itself in the distinguished chant, “We are … Penn State!”

 

Lunging in

By Andrea Klick

Conal Orem (left) faces off Ariel Holstein (right) during Penn State’s fencing camp on Tuesday, July 12, 2016. The fencing camp was held in the White Building and is a week long camp. (Photo by Christian Milcos)

About 70 teenage fencers from around the country arrived in State College on July 10 to train under Penn State staff.

Students in sixth through 12th grade with at least one year of experience may attend one or both of the five-day sessions in July to gain “competitive fencing instruction and extensive bouting experiences with different and new partners,” according to the camp’s website.

The record-breaking 13-time NCAA champions practice on the bottom floor of the White Building, where their record-breaking 12 second-place NCAA titles are showcased.

All-Sport Museum director Ken Hickman recognizes the team’s accomplishments.

“Particularly, the last 35 years, I’d say, have had unprecedented success,” Hickman said. “We’ve had phenomenal coaching with that program. In terms of individuals at the Olympics, we’ve sent a good number, and some of them have had really good success. We had a Polish fencer in recent years who won a bronze.”

Members and coaches of this winning team come together at the summer camp to advise the next generation of fencers.

Head coach Wes Glon sees the camp as an opportunity “for the kids to come to Penn State, to see Penn State and also to promote fencing in the community.”

Penn State Fencing head coach Wes Glon talks about the next generation of fencing. (Photo by Christian Milcos)

Junior Najiyyah Clark, a member of Penn State fencing, became an instructor at the camp last year.

“(I enjoy) getting to know the kids better, especially some of the kids that I’ve met from last year’s camp and just seeing them grow and hanging out with them,” Clark said.

Glon believes the camp encourages students to pursue fencing at Penn State.

“I see them during their time (here),” he said. “They’re very much expressing that like, ‘Hey I like it here. I want to be a student at Penn State.’”

Clark also noticed many of the campers expressing interest in continuing fencing.

“Especially a lot of the younger ones (have an interest) since fencing is a sport that you start when you’re younger,” she said. “Even some of the older kids who started late like me, they said they definitely wanted to continue to college, at least.”

In addition to fencing technique and physical training, Clark hopes to teach the campers life lessons during their time at Penn State.

“Definitely try to teach them to never give up,” Clark said. “Especially with the younger ones, not to be discouraged if they’re losing and to keep trying — keep doing better each bout and each day.”

 

 

The great tour at the All-Sports Museum and Beaver Stadium

By Katrina Wang & Jenny Liu

Diving past adversity and cycling into the future of Paralympic athletes

By Olivia Lattanzi

Imagine trying to dive without a sense of balance or cycling despite having a damaged neck and nerves, brain trauma and blindness in the left eye.

Many people might choose to let disabilities like this define them, but this is not the case for two former Penn State athletes who worked their way toward the Olympics and Paralympics.

Over the years, Penn State has had several athletes that did not let disadvantages define them. Instead, they use them as a reason to work harder.

Battling the unseen

At first glance, it may not seem like there is anything different about diver Mary Ellen Clark. She is described as “fun, outgoing and one of the finest female divers of all time” by Ken Hickman, director of the Penn State All-Sports Museum.

The Penn State All-Sports Museum commemorates Mary Ellen Clark’s Olympic legacy. (Photo by Olivia Lattanzi)

Clark has a disability that can not be seen; she has bouts of vertigo, which causes her to have the sensation that she or the world around her is spinning. This not only affects the extreme precision and balance needed for diving but also affects her sense of direction once she enters the water.

“I need someone to make sure I swim to the top and not down to the bottom,” Clark has been quoted as saying. “It can happen.”

The spiraling motion that she makes when flying through the air is what causes this loss of direction.

Although it certainly made diving more difficult, it did not stop her from becoming a two-time Olympic medalist.

Persistence pays off

Clark started her diving career at a young age but was not diagnosed with the disease until 1988.

She first started feeling the effects while she was at practice one day and began to feel dizzy. Instead of choosing to take a break from diving, Clark decided to train through it and was back to normal within six months.

She had another bout two years before she went on to win bronze at the 1992 Olympic games in Barcelona.

Before the Atlanta Olympic games in 1996, she had taken nine months off the previous year because of the vertigo. She went on to win her second bronze.

Learning how to deal

Clark is not the only former Penn State athlete who has represented the United States team while competing for gold. During this year’s Rio Paralympic Games, Shawn Morelli will be a member of the United States cycling team.

During a 2007 deployment in Afghanistan, Morelli — then an army engineer officer — was injured by an explosive device, which resulted in injury to her neck and nerves, brain trauma and blindness in her left eye.

In 2010, she was first exposed to competitive cycling and since then has used it to help strengthen her body and give her better balance while she deals with physical and visual limitations.

“I am learning how to deal with challenges, from my body, or from racing,” Morelli was quoted as saying on the U.S. Paralympics website. “I don’t know what my potential is, or how far I can or will take this. I am going to keep going for as long as I can.”

 

Becoming equal

By Aleah Green 

 At a 2016 Penn State women’s volleyball game in Rec Hall, the crowd was filled with excited students, staff and families waiting to cheer on the Nittany Lions.

But what if it was 1875 and “Pennsylvania State University” was the “Agricultural College of Pennsylvania” and the only sports team (baseball) on campus consisted solely of males? It wasn’t until 89 years later in 1964 that the Women’s Intercollegiate Sports Program was introduced. It would later grow to become one of the most progressive platforms for female athletes.

Jim Voigt, the All-Sports Museum supervisor, and Ken Hickman, the All-Sports Museum director contended that Penn State was one of the front-runners on inclusiveness in sports at the collegiate level, and 1964 was only the beginning to years of integration, success and equal opportunity.

Aleah_women1

Jim Voigt looks over Beaver Stadium while giving a tour to Penn State College of Communications journalism camp students. (Photo by Aleah Green)

Aside from the prominent strides women have made in volleyball, the Lions have positively impacted track and field, basketball and many other male-dominated sports. Along the substantial list of success stories include Michelle Thompson and Stacy Frank (track and field) both qualifying for the U.S. Olympic Trials in 1992, Mary Ellen Clark (gymnastics) receiving an Olympic medal in 1992 and 1996 and Suzie McConnell (basketball) receiving a gold medal in the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

Penn State sports in 2016 do not appear to be confined to the gender norms constantly enforced by society. If it were, women’s lacrosse would not have made it to the final four of the NCAA championship. Five players on women’s soccer would not be going to the World Cup. Women’s volleyball would not have had seven national championships, and the many other accomplishments of women athletes would not exist.

As for what is left to come, although Voigt said some of Penn State’s best known and successful athletes have been women, there is always work to be done.

In order for the success of female athletes to continue beyond the stadiums and buildings of Penn State, it’s going to take more than the sole work of the campus. Hickman said the best way to gain the support of the community is to “make the community aware and create a partnership.”

Marketing plays a large part in Penn State’s journey to athletic abundance.  Their 11 vs. 100, in which 11 athletes play against 100 children on the field, attract families and communities to women’s sports games as equally as men’s.

But the work is never exactly finished in women’s sports.

“I think most of us look at them as being equal — not the same but equal,” Voigt said in reference to female athletes. “Equal partners in the athletic program that we have.”

A Penn State women’s basketball jersey featured in a display case at the All- Sports Museum. (Photo by Aleah Green)

For Penn State athletics, the future is forever promising. Will there ever be a woman to play on the football team? Hickman said there is always a possibility, especially with the various opportunities that Penn State has committed itself to.

“We’ve come a long way and we have a long way to go,” Voigt said.

 

Penn State athletic museum fascinates visitors

By Victoria Mione

The All-Sports Museum located on the Pennsylvania State University campus showcases sports achievements of the school using hands-on activities and memorabilia to engage visitors while also entertaining and educating those who enter.

Visitors exit after a self-guided tour throughout the two stories of the All-Sports Museum.

The museum is part of Beaver Stadium, which is home of the Nittany Lions, and features popular sports like football and baseball, less common sports like golf and fencing and even sports that are no longer played at Penn State.

“I like the diversity of different types of sports that they have,” Linden Markley, a 15-year-old Huntingdon, Pennsylvania native, said. “It’s interesting to learn about sports that are less popular.”

Even though boxing and rifling are no longer played at Penn State, they are commemorated within the All-Sports Museum.

Major events that took place for each university sport were displayed and highlighted in the museum. Interactive exhibits were paired with facts alongside tokens of the university’s athletic history and success.

Video by Jharia Morris

Christian Milcos (left) and Matthew Hensen (right) discuss sports as they walk around the museum. Both are sports fanatics — Milcos favoring basketball and Hensen preferring football.

Christian Milcos (left) and Matthew Hensen (right) discuss sports as they walk around the museum. Both are sports fanatics — Milcos favoring basketball and Hensen preferring football.

Aleah Green, a 16-year-old New York native, said she learned a lot about the past of Penn State’s men’s and women’s sports and the differences between the two as well as “the wonderful accomplishments Penn State has had in its sports.”

According to the All-Sports Museum website, the mission of the museum is to honor the achievements of the men and women who have built the proud tradition of Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics through the preservation and promotion of their legacy for the education and benefit of the community.

Adriana Frazier, a 15-year-old from Philadelphia, said she learned about how football has evolved from the 1800s to modern day, as well as Penn State traditions.

The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. A donation of $5 for adults and $3 for children, students and groups of 10 people or more is suggested while school group tours are free.

Adriana Frazier poses with a statue of the Nittany Lion in the lobby of the All-Sports Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light the torch

By Faith Lynn & Morgan Bergman

With the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro approaching in August, many Penn State students are going to the Olympic trials. Looking back at past Olympians can inspire future athletes.

Olympic_1: Herman Goffberg carried the Olympic torch Tuesday, June 11, 1996 through Erie, Pennsylvania. The torch was carried for 84 days through the United Sates and is now displayed in the All-Sports Museum at Penn State University.

Olympic_2: Through his lifetime, Coach Eugene “Mr. Gymnastics” Wettstone guided Penn State gymnastics to win nine NCAA championships, 13 Eastern crowns and 35 national individual titles. In addition, he coached the United States men gymnasts in 1948 and 1956 for the Summer Olympics.

Olympic_3: Steve Cohen was not only a consecutive NCAA All Around Champion in 1966 and 1967. He competed as an individual in the Summer Olympics in 1986 Mexico City.

Olympic_4: Various Penn State students have competed in miscellaneous events in the Olympics. Kurt Oppelt figure skated in Oslo during the 1952 Winter Olympics. Other Nittany Lions did research, trained and coached.

Olympic_5: Gold medalist Suzie McConnell graduated in 1988 and soon after became the playmaking guard for the U.S. Olympic team that won the gold medal in Seoul. She also played in the 1992 Summer Olympic games in Barcelona after coming out of retirement.

Olympic_6: Diver Mary Ellen Clark won bronze in both 1992 and 1996 after graduating in 1985. She suffered from vertigo in 1995 before going to the Olympic trials in 1996.

Olympic_7: In 1982 Brenda Stauffer was named “collegiate player of the year” while attending Penn State. She was part of the bronze winning U.S. field hockey team in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

Olympic_8: Named All-American three times for soccer and once for football, Chris Bahr was drafted in the first round for the American Soccer League by the Philadelphia Atoms. In 1976 he played for the U.S. soccer team in Montreal for the Summer Olympics. Not only was he a soccer star, but he was also a football star in the NFL.

Olympic_9: “We’ve had a whole host of Olympians, and we are waiting on getting the final list for this year’s crop,” Ken Hickman said at a conference with Penn State Communications Camp students and on Tuesday, July 12, 2016.

 

The champions that never were

By Matt Hensen and Chelsea Kun

The year of 1994 was exceptional for Penn State football. The team was undefeated and featured five All-Americans, including quarterback Kerry Collins, who went on to have a long NFL career.

The team was noted for its explosive offense, which averaged 47 points per game, and earned several dominating victories over teams such as Ohio State, USC and Iowa. The team was ranked in the top 10 all season and capped it off with a Rose Bowl victory over Oregon.

Adriana Frazier reads about Penn State All-Americans at the All-Sports Museum. (Photo by Chelsea Kun)

However, there was one accolade that Penn State wasn’t able to earn: the honor of being the National Champions of the 1994-95 season. That honor went to the Nebraska Cornhuskers, a team that was also undefeated, but that Penn State was not allowed to play.

Due to previous contractual obligations, the Nittany Lions were forced to play in the Rose Bowl while Nebraska played in the Orange Bowl. The situation caused so much controversy that the Bowl Coalition was disbanded and replaced with the Bowl Alliance. Eventually, it contributed to the creation of the Bowl Championship Series and later the College Football Playoff.

A display case at the Penn State All-Sports Museum includes a Sports Illustrated cover that features the 1995 Rose Bowl. (Photo by Chelsea Kun)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1994 Nittany Lions are not the only team to go undefeated in Penn State history. Among the blue bloods of college football, Penn state has created a rich tradition over its 129-year history.

Boasting 856 wins, 28 bowl wins and four claimed national championships in its long history, Penn State’s teams have had seven undefeated seasons (1887, 1912, 1968, 1969, 1973, 1986, and 1994). Despite going undefeated these years, they were only named National Champions in two out of those seven years (1912 and 1986).

The other five teams ran the table but failed to impress the voters, and as a result, they joined a long list of undefeated teams that never won the National Championship of College Football. Former head coach Joe Paterno, who led Penn State to five undefeated seasons, was a long-time advocate of having a college football playoff system, according to a 2008 ESPN article. Paterno wanted undefeated teams to get a chance to prove that they could be champions.

Jim Voigt, long-time fan and operational supervisor at the Penn State All-Sports Museum, firmly believes that the 1994 team would have beaten Nebraska that year.

“They could score from anywhere on the field, no matter what the situation,” Voigt said, adding that the team was “the most exciting team to watch.”

The Lions would get their revenge eight years later when they trounced Nebraska 40-7 in front of the largest crowd in Penn State history (110,753).

Ken Hickman, the director of the museum, was a freshman at Penn State during the ‘94 football year and remembers the game fondly.

“We finally got a chance to play Nebraska eight years later and absolutely beat their pants off,” he said.

After all these years, the ‘94 team is still remembered for its exploits on the field and for its championship snub. But with the College Football Playoff, teams like the ‘94 team will get a chance to prove their worth.

Beaver Stadium is home to Penn State’s Nittany Lions. (Photo by Chelsea Kun)